48 Restaurants Make 2018 Michelin Guide Seoul’s Bib Gourmand Selection

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Michelin Guide Seoul has announced the new Bib Gourmand selection, ahead of the release of the 2018 Seoul guide next week. Of the 36 restaurants awarded the Bib last year, 31 retained their status while 17 new entrants made the updated list, making the total count to 48.

Six new food categories debuted in this year’s Bib selection, including dwaeji-gukbap (pork soup), gomtang (beef soup), Korean contemporary, memil-guksu (buckwheat noodles), Taiwanese, udon and Vietnamese. This year’s selection showcases some of Korea’s most beloved dishes as well as the growing diversity of Seoul’s dining scene.

Take Mapo ok, for instance. The restaurant has been serving seolleongtang (beef soup) for close to 70 years since it opened up for business in 1949. Koreans’ love for soup and rice are definitely noticeable in this year’s selection as it also includes Hadongkwan, a legendary institution located in the heart of Seoul which serves what is considered the most sublime bowl of gomtang and rice in the city. Meanwhile, Okdongsik, the pioneer of a new genre of pork soup featuring a consommé-like clear broth and a generous heaping of thinly-sliced lean Berkshire K pork, also received a Bib nod. The 100 bowls of soup the restaurant serves each day sells out fast.

Buckwheat noodles are another delicious and affordable Korean staple enjoyed by locals every day. New entrant Yangyang Memil Makguksu makes its noodles from scratch, to order, using 100% buckwheat flour. The freshly-made noodles are served Gangwondo style – in chilled briny dongchimi (winter radish kimchi) water with plenty of crushed laver, sesame seeds and half a boiled egg. Mi Jin, another new entrant, serves Japanese zaru soba-style buckwheat noodles with noodles made daily in its own factory located below the restaurant.

Mish Mash, categorized under ‘Korean contemporary’ uses traditional ingredients like kimchi and fermented condiments to create innovative dishes that do not restrict themselves to a set genre. “Expect the unexpected” seems to be the motto here.

In addition to Korean food, Asian cuisine such as Vietnamese, udon and Taiwanese also made this year’s selection. Inaniwa Yosuke, the Seoul outpost of Sato Yosuke in Tokyo, serves Inaniwa-style udon. Emoi, a relative newcomer to the Seoul dining scene, specializes in authentic Hanoi-style pho, while Wooyukmien is one of the rare spots in the city where diners can get a taste of Taiwanese beef noodle soup that is as close to the real deal as it gets.

Restaurants selected for the Bib Gourmand list offers food for under KRW35,000, equivalent to 40 U.S. dollars.

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2018 Michelin Guide Seoul Bib Gourmand Full List

Gaeseong Mandu Koong / Mandu

Kyodaia / Udon

Goobok Mandu / Mandu

A Flower Blossom on the Rice / Korean

Nampo Myeonok / Naengmyeon

Neung Ra Do / Naengmyeong

Daesungjip / Dogani-tang

Mapo ok / Seolleongtang

Mandujip / Mandu

Manjok Ohyang Jokbal / Jokbal

Myeongdong Kyoja / Kal-guksu

Mokcheon Jip (Encore Kalguksu) / Kal-guksu

Minami / Soba

Mish Mash / Korean contemporary

Mijin / Memil-guksu

Mealbon / Kal-guksu

Baecnyunok / Dubu

Bongpiyang / Naengmyeon

Buchon Yukhoe / Yukhoe

Bukmakgol / Korean

Samcheongdong Sujebi / Sujebi

Subaru / Soba

Yangyang Memil Makguksu / Memil-guksu

Emoi / Vietnamese

Yukjeon Hoekwan / Bulgogi

Ogane Jokbal / Jokbal

Ogeunnae Dakgalbi / Barbecue

Ojangdong Hamheung Naengmyeon / Naengmyeon

Oh Tongyoung / Korean

Okdongsik / Dwaeji-gukbap

Yonggeumok / Chueo-tang

Wooyuk Mien / Taiwanese

Inaniwa Yosuke / Udon

Imun Seollnongtang / Seolleongtang

Limbyungjoo Sandong Kalguksu / Kal-guksu

Jaha Son Manu / Mandu

Jungin Myeonok / Naengmyeon

Jinmi Pyeogyang Naengmyeon / Naengmyeon

Chanyangjip / Kal-guksu

Chungmuro Jjukkumi Bulgogi / Barbecue

Tuktuk Noodle Thai / Thai

Piyangkong Halmani / Dubu

Pildong Myeonok / Naengmyeon

Hadongkwan / Gom-tang

Hanilkwan / Korean

Halmaejip / Jokbal

Hwanggeum Kongbat / Dubu

Hwangsaenga Kalguksu / Kal-guksu